Does your logo scare away clients?

Let’s face it, not all designs are created equal. I’ve designed hundreds of logos over the last 19 years, during which time my thoughts about logo design have evolved. There’s no magic formula that goes into creating the perfect logo, although, there are some fundamental points I consider when I’m designing or redesigning a logo.

Design for your audience.

A logo’s a communication tool. It shouldn’t be created to impress a family member, friend, or self-interests. It should be designed to communicate to a specific group of audience to assist in driving sales. Ages, demographics, locations, interests, incomes, marital status’, values …  aspects like these should always be considered when a logo’s being designed.

Dare to be different.

A logo’s designed to be seen. Avoid appearing like everyone else in your market. If the industry is swaying one way, it can often be in your best interest to go in the other direction. Find a competitive edge, shake it up, expose a niche be unique. It can help you be noticed. But don’t go overboard with creativity. Adding in everything in just for the sake of being unique can also work against you.  

Logos are symbols.

Symbols are a visual representation of an idea or some deeper meaning. Standing out and being different can help you get noticed, but if the symbol doesn’t stand for anything, you might just end up falling short. Depending on your business, your competitive edge might be quality, price, time, status, or any number of other aspects. Whatever’s chosen, it should represent your business, should help attract clients, and be congruent with how you want them to view your business.

Keep it simple.

The more complex a design is, the longer it’ll take for a person to recall it with any accuracy. We’re completely over-saturated with advertising every moment of every day. Logos are everywhere, on everything. And it’s overwhelming, even for us professionals.  I’m sure we can all appreciate a complex composition of music, movie or piece of art. Although, deep down, we really do crave simplicity.

Avoid trends.

Bell bottoms, shoulder pads, big hair, fanny packs, and mullets have all had there 15 minutes of fame and are hopefully gone forever. Graphics and logos have all had their own blunders and faux pas – just think back to MySpace where every site had a bunch of drop shadows, outer glows, or fonts like papyrus and comic sans. These are all things you look back on and cringe. Keep clear of fleeting trends.

Versatility is key.

Logos go on everything. Websites, business cards, clothing, cars, and promotional products. The list is endless. The logo should be able to be screen printed, embroidered, or even faxed. It should be recognizable at small and large sizes. It should look good in black and white as well. And all of the while it should maintain your brand identity and its composure. After all, your logo should be your logo in every situation.

Summary.

Regardless of how great a logo appears, your logo’s a communication tool. Logos can offer an edge over your competition and leave a lasting mark. Just remember, the buck doesn’t stop there. Every aspect of your business will fall under scrutiny by your competition as well as your clients. Websites, advertisements, marketing, communications: they’re all up for grabs. Protect your investment and you’ll be rewarded.

Now, if you think your logo can use a bit of love, send us an email and we’ll be in touch shortly.