What is UX / user experience?

The UX or the user experience is how a person’s attitude and emotions relates to a product or system.

The context for understanding where the UX / user experience fits in.

In recent years there's been extremely high competition in how people interact with computer applications, mobile apps and web development. And due to high competition, developers focus extensively on how to maximize our experience with the software with the least amount of effort on the users part. The ultimate goal is to ensure that product meets the following metrics listed below. Now, keep in mind, the following list operates on a sliding scale for each separate person rather than a yes or no checkbox.

The main factors outlining UX.

Purpose: Does the system fulfill a purpose? This may sound ridiculous, but, keep this mind: just because it's useful to one person, does not mean its useful to another.

Usability: The ease or complexity to use a system. Try to ensure anyone who uses the system can do so with little to no effort.

Availability: Does the system allow for non-conventional variables, such as accommodating persons with disabilities.

Desirability: The overall design and aesthetics of the system needs to be pleasing to help evoke appreciation and emotions. One example of this is how car companies change and update models every year. The goal is to have its users fall in love with the overall design, function and just about every aspect of the vehicle, including the brand behind it.

Brand Authority: The system has or evokes trust within the system. In order to offer a system that people can trust, the company behind it has needs to be to hold high standards and ethics people stand behind.

Accessibility: It needs to be easy to find and use the given system. Having a great product or service is a start, but people need to be able to find and access it. Also, is it easy to purchase?

Once all the of the main factors have been carefully considered, and you have your product or service in hand, it's time to test everything out and carefully evaluate the metrics you receive. When it comes to web development, it's often easily done with website metrics as you can track almost everything regarding a website from the amount of traffic to a landing page to where they came from, to what they searched to find you. Then, after looking at the data you've collected, you begin making alterations and tweak your efforts to produce the optimal results.